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Stream: Blasts

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Nigel Waters's picture

The following statement was made to the APEC Data Privacy Subgroup meeting on 24 June 2013, in Medan, Sumatra, by Nigel Waters, attending the meeting as an invited guest. At previous meetings Mr Waters has represented Privacy International, but due to difficulties in obtaining guest status for PI (or other privacy or consumer NGOs) he has attended the last two meetings in an individual capacity. In the absence of a formal multi-stakeholder mechanism, he seeks to bring the perspective of international civil society to bear in the APEC privacy work.

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Carly Nyst's picture

A committee of Australian MPs reviewing a package of proposals by the Attorney General have raised serious concerns about their potential implications for privacy and civil liberties.

In considering a proposal to drastically expand the country’s data retention practices, the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Intelligence and Security slammed the Attorney-General for failing to provide sufficient information about the proposed changes, noting that the controversial proposal “was only accorded just over two lines of text”. Should a data retention regime be introduced, said the Committee, it must only apply to metadata, excluding content and internet browsing data, and should be subject to a rigorous oversight regime.

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Mike Rispoli's picture

Privacy International is looking for volunteers to help its Communications team, specifically researching and writing for Privacy International's blog. Areas of focus would be on breaking news, investigative reporting, and thoughtful analysis on technology and human rights, surveillance, and privacy. If you are interested in journalism or writing, this is a great opportunity to build your portfolio.

Each volunteer will have the opportunity to work alongside Privacy International's small, passionate team as we work to hold companies selling intrusive surveillance technology and the states using it to account.

Volunteers will assist Privacy International's team at our offices in Holborn and must be able to commit to a minimum of three days per week for two months. At the moment we only offer placements to those who can come into the office. Desirable applicants will possess:

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Mike Rispoli's picture

Privacy International is looking for volunteers to help with its Big Brother Incorporated project, an investigation into the global surveillance industry focusing on the sale of technologies to brutal and oppressive regimes intent on using them as tools of political control. We're looking for volunteers who are able to help us with factual and legal research in relation to our casework.

Each volunteer will have the opportunity to work alongside Privacy International's small, passionate team as we work to hold companies selling intrusive surveillance technology and the states using it to account.

Volunteers will assist Privacy International's team at our offices in Holborn and must be able to commit to a minimum of three days per week for two months. At the moment we only offer placements to those who can come into the office. Desirable applicants will possess:

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Mike Rispoli's picture

Are you looking to join a small charity that punches above its weight in holding governments and corporations to account? We are seeking creative and passionate people who are keen to work on meaningful projects at the cutting edge of human rights and technology.

Then you're in luck. Privacy International is seeking to hire two new full-time positions to work with the Big Brother Incorporated project team, a Policy Officer and a Research Officer.

The Policy Officer would work with the Legal Officer and Head of Research as part of the Big Brother Incorporated project to raise the profile and understanding of issues related to the export of surveillance technology in the UK and internationally. The Policy Officer will also coordinate an international campaign for introducing export controls on surveillance technology. 

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Mike Rispoli's picture

Privacy International is building a comprehensive resource of the world's surveillance and privacy laws, and we need your help. As part of the Global Surveillance Monitor project, recent tasks undertaken by volunteers have included: researching the right to privacy in constitutions around the world, locating and analyzing the EU's data retention laws, and researching global data protection regimes. We need additional help on two of these projects, in the form of: 

(1) identifying native-language versions of the world's constitutions, and
(2) further researching global data protection regimes. 

Each volunteer will have the opportunity to work alongside Privacy International's small, passionate team as we work to build a global privacy resource. We're looking for volunteers who are sufficiently interested in various aspects of the privacy field that they find enjoyable some of the 'grunt work' entailed in these tasks.

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Carly Nyst's picture

Are you looking to join a small charity that punches above its weight in holding governments and corporations to account? We're seeking a Research Officer to play a key role in the Privacy in the Developing World programme, and in PI's regional and international human rights advocacy. If you're passionate about privacy issues, have extensive experience in the human rights or development sectors, and a desire to work on meaningful projects at the cutting edge of human rights and technology, check out the job description and person specification. Applications are due by 6pm on Tuesday 7 May 2013.

 
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Dr Gus Hosein's picture

Update: The request was refusedI confirm that the Cabinet Office holds information relevant to your request. I must inform you that the Cabinet Office is withholding this information because it is exempt under the exemption at section 23(1) (Information supplied by, or relating to, bodies dealing with security matters and national security) of the Freedom of Information Act. Section 23 is an absolute exemption; we do not therefore have to apply the public interest test. 

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Sam Smith's picture

SchNEWS just tweeted this photo of protesters being blocked by a steel police cordon. This cordon has made frequent appearances at recent public order situations across the UK, including in South Wales, Leicestershire and Greater Manchester, but was originally developed for deployment during chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) incidents by Cobham plc. More details can be found in the company's 2010 marketing material, which was made available as part of the SpyFiles.

Tools and technology created and purchased for one purpose are often ultimately used for another; this kind of "mission creep"  is particularly pervasive in the surveillance context, where technologies that are initially intended for use only in the most serious national security cases gradually enter regular policing. 

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Eric King's picture

It was recently reported that President Obama has signed an executive order giving the Department of Homeland Security powers to prioritize government communications in emergencies, and to effectively seize control of telecommunications companies. In the run up to the Olympics, questions have been asked about whether the British state has similar powers.

Under section 132 of the Communications Act 2003, the Secretary of State can compel Ofcom to order a telecommunications company to suspend services. This could happen if the company in question was in breach of a condition of its licence - but the provision has never been invoked.

More pertinent is section 20 of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 which gives senior ministers of the Crown substantial powers in the event of emergencies, which would include switching off all or some of a telecommunication provider's network or service.

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