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Ireland

Ireland

In the media
Publisher: 
RTE
Publication date: 
27-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Morning Ireland
Original story link: 

Dr Richard Tynan, of lobby group Privacy International, discusses a garda tender outlining requirements to collect phone calls at 21 stations.

Countries: 
Blog
Dr Richard Tynan's picture

The 'GSOC saga' began a number of weeks ago with the revelation that the oversight body of the Irish police force, the Garda Siochana Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), may have been the target of sophisticated electronic surveillance. A security company, Verrimus, found that there was evidence that an IMSI Catcher device may have been deployed in the vicinity of GSOC's offices which could have intercepted all mobile phone communications of its officers and anyone visiting the offices.

Blog
Dr Richard Tynan's picture

In the ongoing story about the possible surveillance of the Garda Siochana Ombudsman Commission in Ireland, a number of new details have emerged from Verrimus, the security consultancy agency tasked with investigating the spying. A recent Irish Independent report levelled a number of criticisms at Verrimus, saying that Verrimus in fact detected their own UK phones during their sweep and that they erroneously claimed this to be evidence of a UK IMSI Catcher.

In response to the Independent’s claims, Verrimus stated:

Blog
Dr Richard Tynan's picture

The recent revelations surrounding the bugging of the Garda Siochana Ombudsman Commission (GSOC) has raised a number of important questions about the use of surveillance technologies in Ireland, including whether fake base stations were deployed in order to monitor mobile networks near GSOC's office.

Blog
Eric King's picture

Privacy International has compiled data on the privacy provisions in national constitutions around the world, including which countries have constitutional protections, whether they come from international agreements, what aspects of privacy are actually protected and when those protections were enacted. We are pleased to make this information available under a Creative Commons license for organizations, researchers, students and the community at large to use to support their work (and hopefully contribute to a greater understanding of privacy rights).

The categories

Though the right to privacy exists in several international instruments, the most effective privacy protections come in the form of constitutional articles. Varying aspects of the right to privacy are protected in different ways by different countries. Broad categories include:

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Ireland. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. The latest version of this report was updated by Colin Irwin at the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), in July 2010 by Rossa McMahon of Patrick G. McMahon Solicitors and in August 2010 by TJ McIntyre of University College Dublin.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation
In the media
Publisher: 
Financial Times
Publication date: 
21-Dec-2011
Author(s): 
Tim Bradshaw
Original story link: 

Privacy International, a non-profit “watchdog” organisation, said the audit presented a “damning assessment of the company’s approach to privacy”, which it described as “patchy and unstable”. 

“Even as a charitable assessment by Europe’s softest privacy regulator it has unravelled a mass of difficult privacy issues,” said Privacy International’s Simon Davies. “The Irish audit is a promising start but other privacy regulators should now conduct rigorous assessments into the unexplored dynamics of the site.”
 

Countries: 
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