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United Kingdom

Press release

Some of the world's largest telecommunication companies are facing legal action for colluding with British spy agency GCHQ and failing to protect customers' privacy rights, Privacy International said in a letter issued to the cable providers.

In the media
Publisher: 
BBC
Publication date: 
24-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Espiner
Original story link: 

The data regulator began investigating the use of number plate recognition in the town after a complaint in June 2011 by three civil liberties groups: No CCTV, Big Brother Watch and Privacy International.

"Royston police decided to track everyone without any clear reason," said Privacy International executive director Gus Hosein.

"Just because a technology enables mass surveillance, that doesn't mean that it is right to do so."

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In the media
Publisher: 
V3
Publication date: 
24-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Michael Passingham
Original story link: 

The investigation carried out by the ICO stemmed from a joint complaint from privacy activist groups Big Brother Watch, Privacy International and No CCTV. The ICO found that Hertfordshire Constabulary failed to carry out "any effective impact assessments" before the system went live.

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In the media
Publisher: 
Tech Week Europe
Publication date: 
24-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Brewster
Original story link: 

Complaints had been lodged by the Big Brother Watch, Privacy International and No CCTV, before the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) investigated the matter.

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Blog
Sam Smith's picture

Barclays recently announced that they were looking to sell "aggregated" customer data to third parties. While the news sparked concern among the UK public, the practice, unfortunately, is becoming common among many industries.

A few months ago, it was revealed that Everything Everywhere appeared to be selling location and de-identified data to Ipsos MORI, who in turn made it available to third parties, which included offering it to the Police. Despite another outcry from the public, this type of sale doesn't appear to be stopping.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Atlantic
Publication date: 
16-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Olga Khazan
Original story link: 

"If their motivation is to catch terrorists, then are there less intrusive methods than spying on everyone whose traffic happens to transverse the U.K.?" said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International.

In the media
Publisher: 
Al Jazeera
Publication date: 
21-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Simon Hooper
Original story link: 

Mike Rispoli of the privacy campaign group Privacy International said there were no clear rules governing border stops, especially regarding access to electronic data.

"The fact is that when the Terrorism Act was passed [in 2000] phones were very different to what they are now," he told Al Jazeera. "Now our phones carry so much information. They have pictures, they have browsing history and location information, along with text messages and phone numbers. We are operating in a legal framework that is woefully outdated."

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
The Independent
Publication date: 
22-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Kunal Dutta
Original story link: 

Privacy International recently submitted a legal challenge calling on the suspension of Britain’s use of information from the National Security’s Agency Prism programme, and from the Tempora programme of surveillance of emails, phone calls and Skype conversations.

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In the media
Publisher: 
The World
Publication date: 
17-Jul-2013
Author(s): 
Jason Margolis
Original story link: 

Eric King with the London-based human rights organization Privacy International said today’s finding “wasn’t surprising.” He said Parliament has become too friendly with the intelligence agencies they’re meant to be investigating.

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Blog
Alinda Vermeer's picture

Following reports that the Mexican prosecution authority appears to be not only using FinFisher, but also to be involved in a corruption scandal surrounding the purchase of this intrusive surveillance technology, the Mexican Permanent Commission (composed of members of the Mexican Senate and Congress) has urged Mexico's Federal Institute for Access to Public Information and Data Protection (IFAI) to investigate the use of spyware in Mexico.

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