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United Kingdom

In the media
Publisher: 
Deutsche Welle
Publication date: 
04-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Ben Knight
Original story link: 

 Though it is unsurprising that allied intelligence agencies cooperate and share information, the document did reveal a new facet of the relationship. "What we weren't previously aware of was the level of collusion when it comes to getting round surveillance law," Privacy International spokesman Mike Rispoli told DW. "We can't really be sure, but what we can infer is that when government officials discuss information sharing, they say, 'look at our laws here, look at what we're doing, look how lax our surveillance law is here, … you should get on board with this.' "

In the media
Publisher: 
BBC News
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Original story link: 

"With each passing day, the public finds out more and more how private companies are colluding with governments to operate mass surveillance programs that intercept our daily phone calls, text messages, emails and personal data," said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International.

"Far from being coerced, it appears some of the companies have gone well beyond their legal responsibility by colluding with GCHQ on its Tempora [data collection] programme.

In the media
Publisher: 
CorpWatch
Publication date: 
04-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Pratap Chatterjee
Original story link: 

Six global telecommunications companies - British Telecom, Interoute, Level Three, Verizon Enterprise, Viatel and Vodafone Cable - are the subject of a formal complaint by Privacy International for potential violation of human rights such as the right to privacy and freedom of expression.

In the media
Publisher: 
Tech World
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
John E Dunn
Original story link: 

“We call on these companies to do the right thing and halt their involvement with mass surveillance and hope the OECD will investigate what steps, if any, the companies took to defend the human rights of their customers," said King.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Inquirer
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Dave Neal
Original story link: 

Privacy International is challenging ISPs BT and Vodafone and other companies in the telecommunications industry, including Viatel, Verizon and Level 3.

It has also tried to take the UK government in front of a legal tribunal (PDF) to ascertain whether it has acted outside the law, and has filed a claim with the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT).

In the media
Publisher: 
PC World
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Loek Essers
Original story link: 

Privacy International has filed complaints against U.K. telecommunications companies for assisting British intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) with mass interception of telephone and Internet traffic that passes through undersea fiber optic cables.

The formal complaints were filed with the U.K. office of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), which publishes guidelines for responsible business conduct followed by 44 governments including the U.K.

In the media
Publisher: 
PC Pro
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Shona Ghosh
Original story link: 

Privacy International argued that while tech firms such as Google, Facebook and Yahoo have been able to prove their resistance to government access requests, BT, Level 3 and the other companies appear to have rolled over under pressure.

"With each passing day, the public finds out more and more how private companies are colluding with governments to operate mass surveillance programs that intercept our daily phone calls, text messages, emails, and personal data," said the group's head of research, Eric King.

"It is unconscionable to think that the companies that carry our most personal information either refuse to stand up for us, or remain silent when our rights are violated," he said.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
TechWeek Europe
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Brewster
Original story link: 

The group believes the companies may have violated a number of OECD guidelines on human rights, including the right to privacy and freedom of expression, by giving GCHQ access to their fibre-optic cables. It had already written to the providers, but received no response.

Privacy International now wants a formal investigation, and for the companies to come clean about how they collaborated with GCHQ on snooping programmes, like the cable tapping Tempora project.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Nick Hopkins and Matthew Taylor
Original story link: 

Yesterday Privacy International filed complaints with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) against some of the world's leading telecommunication companies for providing assistance to GCHQ's Tempora programme. The group believes up to a dozen OECD guidelines, relating to companies' responsibilities to respect human rights, including the right to privacy and freedom of expression, may have been violated.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
Ars Technica
Publication date: 
04-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Cyrus Farivar
Original story link: 

“With each passing day, the public finds out more and more how private companies are colluding with governments to operate mass surveillance programs that intercept our daily phone calls, text messages, e-mails, and personal data,” said Eric King of Privacy International in a statement.

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