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Edin Omanovic's picture

This week in London, the world's largest arms fair DSEI rolled into town, bringing together some of the world’s most sophisticated killing and torture equipment with some of the world’s worst human rights abusers. On sale this year was also some of the UK’s premier lawful interception and surveillance technology.

Considering the forum in which these technologies are being sold, and the caliber of customers looking to buy it, you would think that the sale of such technology from the UK is regulated in a similar way to the military equipment also on offer. 

In the media
Publisher: 
CorpWatch
Publication date: 
22-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Pratap Chatterjee
Original story link: 

"Tempora would not have been possible without the complicity of these undersea cable providers," says Eric King, head of research at Privacy International. “What we, and the public, deserve to know is this: To what extent are companies cooperating with disproportionate intelligence gathering, and are they doing anything to protect our right to privacy?”

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In the media
Publisher: 
International Business Times
Publication date: 
28-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Alfred Joyner
Original story link: 

Privacy International, a London-based charity which is concerned about Dr Shehabi's safety and the sale of the Finfisher software to intolerant regimes, has now filed a complaint against British HM revenue & customs.

"We recently filed for judicial review of HMRC's refusal to disclose any information to us on whether or not they are investigating a company called Gamma International. Gamma International is a UK company that has developed and is selling a product called FinFisher. FinFisher is malicious software that once it's installed on your computer or mobile phone your every movement online can be tracked," explained Alinda Vermeer, legal advisor at Privacy International.

Blog
Caroline Wilson Palow's picture

The calculated detention, interrogation, and search of David Miranda brings into sharp relief the draconian legal frameworks that define security and policing in the United Kingdom. These events highlight not only the imperilled state of privacy rights and free expression in Britain, but the breakdown of the democratic institutions that should be protecting individuals not only from terrorists, but from unrestrained government power.

Miranda, the partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, was detained at Heathrow Airport on Sunday. He was subjected to almost nine hours of questioning for being associated with a writer and newspaper that has blown the lid off of the overreaching activities of Western intelligence agencies. Miranda also had several of his electronic devices seized, including his laptop, USB thumbdrives, mobile phone, camera, and gaming consoles.

In the media
Publisher: 
International Business Times
Publication date: 
09-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Alistair Charlton
Original story link: 

Filed in the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT), the claim challenges Whitehall along with BT, Vodafone Cable, Verizon Business, Global Crossing, Level 3, Viatel and Interoute, who were all recently identified as collaborating with GCHQ's Tempora mass surveillance programme.

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In the media
Publisher: 
The Telegraph
Publication date: 
09-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Sophie Curtis
Original story link: 

In particular, Privacy International asks the telcos to outline company policies for assessing the lawfulness of government requests, and describe any requests they received from authorities to intercept information, any steps taken to oppose or resist such orders, and the amount they have been paid for their cooperation with governments.

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In the media
Publisher: 
ComputerWorld UK
Publication date: 
09-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Antony Savvas
Original story link: 

"By complying with government requests, companies are unlawfully participating in mass and indiscriminate surveillance and are in breach of Article 8,” said Privacy International.

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In the media
Publisher: 
PC Pro
Publication date: 
09-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Nicole Kobie
Original story link: 

Eric King, head of research at Privacy International, said Tempora's operation would "not have been possible without the complicity" of the named firms. "Despite the companies' obligation to respect human rights standards, particularly when governments seek to violate them, spy agencies are being allowed to conduct mass surveillance on their systems," King said.

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In the media
Publisher: 
TeckWeek Europe
Publication date: 
09-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Brewster
Original story link: 

Privacy International, which has already filed a complaint about the actions of the UK intelligence services, claimed the companies “colluded” with GCHQ and failed to protect customers’ right to privacy.

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In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
08-Aug-2013
Author(s): 
James Ball
Original story link: 

Lawyers for the group Privacy International, whose mission is to defend the right to privacy, have written to the chief executives of the telecoms companies identified last week by the German paper Süddeutsche and the Guardian as collaborating in GCHQ's Tempora program.

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