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CCDP

In the media
Publisher: 
The Washington Post
Publication date: 
03-Apr-2012
Author(s): 
Anthony Faiola and Ellen Nakashima
Original story link: 

“I’m afraid that if this program gets introduced, the U.K. will be leapfrogging Iran in the business of surveilling its citizens,” said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International. “This program is so broad that no other country has yet to try it, and I am dumbfounded they are even considering it here.”

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In the media
Publisher: 
The Inquirer
Publication date: 
03-Apr-2012
Author(s): 
Dave Neal
Original story link: 

Privacy International says that there is no doubt that it is designed to encourage MPs that might not agree with the snooping bill to support it.

"The document contains significant evasions and distortions about the proposed 'Communications Capabilities Development Programme' (CCDP), and is clearly intended to persuade unconvinced Lib Dem MPs to vote in favour of the proposal," it warns.... There are other problematic areas in the briefing, including fudged facts and errors, according to Privacy International's executive director Gus Hosein, and he said that they will contribute to murky debates and threaten civil liberties.

"Debates around communications interception are always plagued by the complexity of the issues at stake. However, given that the Communications Capabilities Development Programme represents one of the most significant threats to civil liberties this country has faced in the past five years, I would have hoped that MPs were at least being given clear and coherent information about it," said Hosein. "How are they supposed to make an informed decision when the issue comes before Parliament if they are presented with briefing documents riddled with factual inaccuracies?"
 

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In the media
Publisher: 
The Register
Publication date: 
03-Apr-2012
Author(s): 
Kelly Fiveash
Original story link: 

Twitter was also the place where an apparent Lib Dem internal briefing note about CCDP was first leaked yesterday afternoon. London-based NGO Privacy International later verified that the document was genuine. The NGO went on to point out that the document contained factual errors and said it appeared to have been written to help convince the junior half of the Coalition to approve the Home Office's net-snooping proposal.

"Debates around communications interception are always plagued by the complexity of the issues at stake. However, given that the Communications Capabilities Development Programme represents one of the most significant threats to civil liberties this country has faced in the past five years, I would have hoped that MPs were at least being given clear and coherent information about it," said PI's executive director Gus Hosein.

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Press release

An internal Liberal Democrat briefing on Home Office plans to massively expand government surveillance was today passed to Privacy International. The document contains significant evasions and distortions about the proposed 'Communications Capabilities Development Programme' (CCDP), and is clearly intended to persuade unconvinced Lib Dem MPs to vote in favour of the proposal.

Blog
Dr Gus Hosein's picture
What do we know?

Very little. The Communication Capabilities Development Programme (CCDP) is going to be included the Queen's Speech next month and we still haven't had public confirmation of the details. What we do know is that there have been secret briefings to MPs designed to scare them into compliance, and secret briefings to industry that were originally designed to calm their fears (but in fact have only served to increase their outrage).

What was previously proposed?

In 2009 the Home Office held a consultation on the possibility of requiring internet service providers (ISPs) and telecommunications companies (telcos), who are qualified as 'Communications Service Providers' under UK law, to install black boxes that would monitor all internet communications streams to collect and store communications data.

Blog
Eric King's picture

For the past 18 months, I've been investigating the export of surveillance technologies from Western countries to despotic regimes, but I never thought I'd see a democratic government proposing to install the kind of mass surveillance system favoured by Al-Assad, Mubarak and Gaddafi. Yet the Home Office's latest plans would allow the authorities unprecedented levels of access to the entire population's phone records, emails, browsing history and activity on social networking sites, entirely unfettered by the courts. This is a system that has no place in a country that would call itself free and democratic.

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