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Privacy International launches international campaign for greater transparency around secretive intelligence sharing activities between governments

Date: 
13 September 2017

Privacy International, in partnership with 30+ national human rights organisations, has today written to national intelligence oversight bodies in over 40 countries seeking information on the intelligence sharing activities of their governments. 

Case Study: The Myth of Free Wi-Fi

Date: 
30 August 2017

Invisible and insecure infrastructure is facilitating data exploitation

Many technologies, including those that are critical to our day-to-day lives do not protect our privacy or security. One reason for this is that the standards which govern our modern internet infrastructure do not prioritise security which is imperative to protect privacy.

 

What happened?

Case Study: Connected Cars and the Future of Car Travel in the Digital Age

Date: 
30 August 2017

As society heads toward an ever more connected world, the ability for individuals to protect and manage the invisible data that companies and third parties hold about them, becomes increasingly difficult. This is further complicated by events like data breaches, hacks, and covert information gathering techniques, which are hard, if not impossible, to consent to. One area where this most pressing is in transportation, and by extension the so-called ‘connected car’.

Case Study: Profiling and Elections - How Political Campaigns Know Our Deepest Secrets

Date: 
30 August 2017

Political campaigns around the world have turned into sophisticated data operations. In the US, Evangelical Christians candidates reach out to unregistered Christians and use a scoring system to predict how seriously millions these of voters take their faith. As early as 2008, the Obama campaign conducted a data operation which assigned every voter in the US a pair of scores that predicted how likely they would cast a ballot, and whether or not they supported him.

Case Study: Fintech and the Financial Exploitation of Customer Data

Date: 
30 August 2017

Financial services are collecting and exploiting increasing amounts of data about our behaviour, interests, networks, and personalities to make financial judgements about us, like our creditworthiness.

Increasingly, financial services such as insurers, lenders, banks, and financial mobile app startups, are collecting and exploiting a broad breadth of data to make decisions about people. This is particularly affecting the poorest and most excluded in societies.

For example, the decisions surrounding whether to grant someone a loan can now be dependent upon:

Clear and universal – the right to privacy at the 120th Session of the Human Rights Committee

Date: 
2 August 2017

What do Honduras, Pakistan, and Switzerland have in common? They are all bound to respect and protect the right to privacy under Article 17 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. And in July 2017, they all also happened to be under the scrutiny of the UN Human Rights Committee, which found the countries’ human rights record wanting in many respects, including the scope of their surveillance legislation.

 

Open NGO Letter to EU Member States and Institutions Regarding the Export of Surveillance Equipment

Date: 
14 July 2017

Following the alarming evidence that EU-made electronic surveillance equipment is still being exported to authoritarian countries around the world, we strongly urge all EU member states and institutions to respect their human rights obligations and call on them to prioritise long overdue EU reforms.

Privacy International Files Lawsuit To Compel Disclosure Of Secretive 1946 Surveillance Agreement

Date: 
6 July 2017

Privacy International has filed a federal lawsuit seeking to compel disclosure of records relating to a 1946 surveillance agreement between the US, UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, known as the “Five Eyes alliance”.* We are represented by Yale Law School’s Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (MFIA). The most recent publicly available version of the Five Eyes surveillance agreement dates from 1955. Our complaint was filed before the U.S.

Shades of “deep grey”; lessons from an undercover surveillance investigation

Date: 
23 June 2017

Al Jazeera recently published an investigation into the shadowy trade of communications surveillance technologies. Their undercover reporter revealed four companies offering to illegally sell highly intrusive surveillance technologies to the governments of South Sudan and Iran, both of which are subject to extensive international sanctions.

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