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Stream: In the media

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In the media
Publisher: 
Wired UK
Publication date: 
14-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Chris Baraniuk
Original story link: 

Sam Smith, a technologist at Privacy International, said the unencrypted data could hypothetically relate to any of Microsoft's cloud services, from Hotmail and Outlook.com email accounts to Xbox Live, Office 365 and SkyDrive cloud storage.

This response seems unlikely to reassure Smith who commented, "Unless Microsoft takes immediate action to rectify this situation, any business or individual using their services to store or transmit sensitive data will have been fundamentally let down by a brand that suggested it was worthy of trust."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Verge
Publication date: 
12-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Warren
Original story link: 

Earlier this year, The Washington Post claimed that the National Security Agency (NSA) had developed a method nine years ago to locate cellphones when they were powered down. The publication didn’t provide technical details on the software or hardware involved, leaving security researchers puzzled by the revelations. Seeking clarification on the technologies invoked, British privacy watchdog Privacy International conducted a survey of eight cellphone manufacturers in August to obtain details on how it would be possible to track a cellphone once it’s turned off.

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In the media
Publisher: 
Deutsche Welle
Publication date: 
08-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Ben Knight
Original story link: 

 "The telecommunications companies can actually do an astonishing amount to push back against this sort of surveillance," Eric King, head of research at Privacy International, told DW. "It's plain that the Tempora program is almost certainly unlawful… Companies don't have an obligation to comply with unlawful requests, and should they wish to challenge them, they would be well within their rights to do so, and would likely be successful."

In the media
Publisher: 
HTXT.Africa
Publication date: 
08-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Adam Oxford
Original story link: 

Human rights organisation Privacy International (PI) has written to the South African government to ask why the Department of Trade and Industry used R3 563 506.45 of public money to fund the development of a telecoms surveillance tool capable of capturing up to 40 million minutes of voice calls a month, which was deployed by the  Libyan regime under Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

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In the media
Publisher: 
BBC News
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Original story link: 

"With each passing day, the public finds out more and more how private companies are colluding with governments to operate mass surveillance programs that intercept our daily phone calls, text messages, emails and personal data," said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International.

"Far from being coerced, it appears some of the companies have gone well beyond their legal responsibility by colluding with GCHQ on its Tempora [data collection] programme.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Nick Hopkins and Matthew Taylor
Original story link: 

Yesterday Privacy International filed complaints with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) against some of the world's leading telecommunication companies for providing assistance to GCHQ's Tempora programme. The group believes up to a dozen OECD guidelines, relating to companies' responsibilities to respect human rights, including the right to privacy and freedom of expression, may have been violated.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
TechWeek Europe
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Brewster
Original story link: 

The group believes the companies may have violated a number of OECD guidelines on human rights, including the right to privacy and freedom of expression, by giving GCHQ access to their fibre-optic cables. It had already written to the providers, but received no response.

Privacy International now wants a formal investigation, and for the companies to come clean about how they collaborated with GCHQ on snooping programmes, like the cable tapping Tempora project.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
PC Pro
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Shona Ghosh
Original story link: 

Privacy International argued that while tech firms such as Google, Facebook and Yahoo have been able to prove their resistance to government access requests, BT, Level 3 and the other companies appear to have rolled over under pressure.

"With each passing day, the public finds out more and more how private companies are colluding with governments to operate mass surveillance programs that intercept our daily phone calls, text messages, emails, and personal data," said the group's head of research, Eric King.

"It is unconscionable to think that the companies that carry our most personal information either refuse to stand up for us, or remain silent when our rights are violated," he said.

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In the media
Publisher: 
PC World
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Loek Essers
Original story link: 

Privacy International has filed complaints against U.K. telecommunications companies for assisting British intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) with mass interception of telephone and Internet traffic that passes through undersea fiber optic cables.

The formal complaints were filed with the U.K. office of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), which publishes guidelines for responsible business conduct followed by 44 governments including the U.K.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Inquirer
Publication date: 
05-Nov-2013
Author(s): 
Dave Neal
Original story link: 

Privacy International is challenging ISPs BT and Vodafone and other companies in the telecommunications industry, including Viatel, Verizon and Level 3.

It has also tried to take the UK government in front of a legal tribunal (PDF) to ascertain whether it has acted outside the law, and has filed a claim with the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT).

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