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Stream: In the media

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In the media
Publisher: 
L'Espresso
Publication date: 
25-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Stefania Maurizi
Original story link: 

Neanche un mese fa “l'Espresso” aveva rivelato che “Privacy International” , una delle più rispettate organizzazioni internazionali per la difesa della privacy, aveva scritto al governo italiano per chiedere spiegazioni sulla Hacking Team, dopo che l'azienda era finita sulle cronache internazionali perché il suo trojan aveva preso di mira attivisti e giornalisti di paesi noti per la repressione politica.

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In the media
Publisher: 
NetzPolitik
Publication date: 
25-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Killian Froitzhuber
Original story link: 

Tim Maurer, Edin Omanovic und Ben Wagner haben für den Digitale Gesellschaft e. V., Privacy International, das Open Technology Institute und die New America Foundation eine Studie zur Problematik (englisch) verfasst, die sich mit den existierenden Regularien ebenso auseinandersetzt wie mit dem technologischen Wettrüsten auf diesem Gebiet und den Wechselwirkungen dieser Bereiche. Im Fokus stehen die Exportkontrollen in den USA, in Großbritannien, Deutschland und der EU sowie das multilaterale Wassenaar-Abkommen.

In the media
Publisher: 
Middle East Monitor
Publication date: 
25-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Alastair Sloan
Original story link: 

Campaign groups such as Privacy International and Amnesty International are currently outspoken in their criticism of lax export controls on IT intrusion software, having expressed their concerns to Parliament repeatedly.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Hill
Publication date: 
24-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Kate Tummarello and Julian Hattem
Original story link: 

Democratic governments could impose limits on the exports of surveillance technology to prevent the tools from being used to suppress the media and violate human rights, according to a new report. The analysis from the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute, Britain’s Privacy International and Germany’s Digitale Gesellschaft found that existing export control regulations are out of date and unsuited for modern technology.

In the media
Publisher: 
Network World
Publication date: 
24-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Bryan Lunduke
Original story link: 

Richard Tynan, writing for PrivacyInternational.org, recently pointed out that the baseband – the firmware in a cellphone that does the actual "communicate with the cellular network" side of things – in Ubuntu-powered phones will remain closed source (and highly proprietary). ... This is, to say the least, a bummer. And Richard Tynan makes the point that this is a missed opportunity for Canonical to have required an Open Source baseband on the phones that ship with Ubuntu.

In the media
Publisher: 
Firedog Lake
Publication date: 
21-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Jane Hamsher
Original story link: 

According to Dr. Richard Tynan, Technologist with Privacy International, “without the ability of the security community to examine the baseband software of the new Ubuntu Phone, the open-source nature of the remaining element may provide no more assurances than other open-source phone operating systems such as Android.”

In the media
Publisher: 
The New Yorker
Publication date: 
12-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Joshua Kopstein
Original story link: 

The other week, Privacy International, a U.K.-based human-rights organization, filed a criminal complaint on Kersmo’s behalf, making him the first U.K. resident to challenge the use of hacking tools by a foreign power. “This case would be important to all refugees who end up in countries where they think they are safe,” Alinda Vermeer, a lawyer with Privacy International, who filed Kersmo’s complaint, told me in a phone interview. That sense of safety is illusory, she said, because countries armed with tools like FinSpy insure that refugees “can be spied on in an equally intrusive way as they were back at home.” Worse, the surveillance also reveals with whom the victims have been communicating, potentially endangering the lives of contacts and relatives still residing in their home country.

In the media
Publisher: 
Bloomberg
Publication date: 
10-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Vernon Silver
Original story link: 

Gus Hosein, executive director of Privacy International in London, says the incident shows how the push for enhanced passport data hasn’t paid off. “It’s not just that the trade-off wasn’t worth it—the proponents of this policy were short-sighted and wanted to play with new technologies while building national biometric databases,” says Hosein, whose group advocates against government intrusions into private life, including the broadening use of biometrics such as iris scans and other measurements of peoples’ features.

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In the media
Publisher: 
Agora Vox
Publication date: 
05-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Flaviano Tarducci
Original story link: 

 Privacy International, una ong che combatte per il diritto alla privacy, ha creato un database liberamente accessibile, dove sono elencate 338 aziende con sede nei Paesi occidentali che vendono tecnologie di sorveglianza a Paesi con regimi repressivi che intendono usarle come strumento di controllo politico. Matthew Rice di Privacy International spiega che le società di sorveglianza svolgono marketing e vendita delle più potenti, invasive e pericolose tecnologie di sorveglianza al mondo, mantenendo relazioni con i regimi repressivi ai quali hanno venduto i loro prodotti. Dal suddetto database risulta che nel milanese ci sono almeno 5 società coinvolte direttamente nella vendita di servizi di sorveglianza a governi autoritari: la RCS di Milano; la Digint di Garbagnate Milanese; la Spektra di Busto Arsizio; la Area di Vozzola Ticino e la Hacking Team di Milano.

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In the media
Publisher: 
The Post Internazionale
Publication date: 
04-Mar-2014
Author(s): 
Anna Ditta
Original story link: 

Queste scoperte hanno suscitato a livello internazionale richieste di regolamentazione delle aziende che, come Hacking Team, producono software di sorveglianza. Da ultimo, l’associazione internazionale per la tutela del diritto alla riservatezza, Privacy International, ha inviato ieri una lettera al ministro per lo sviluppo economico, Federica Guidi, chiedendo che il governo italiano faccia chiarezza sull’azienda milanese e stabilisca un efficace sistema di licenze per l’esportazione di questi software. L’organizzazione ha scritto inoltre al presidente della regione Lombardia, Roberto Maroni, perché faccia chiarezza sui soldi che nel 2007 Hacking Team ha ricevuto - 1,5 milioni di euro forniti da due fondi di venture capital, uno dei quali è “Finlombarda Gestioni Sgr”, che ha un unico azionista, “Finlombarda SpA”, cioè la finanziaria per lo sviluppo della regione Lombardia.

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