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Stream: In the media

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In the media
Publisher: 
Computer Weekly
Publication date: 
07-Feb-2014
Author(s): 
Warwick Ashford
Original story link: 

Liberty, Big Brother Watch and Privacy International have described the inquiry as “deeply flawed” in an open letter to the ISC with copies to the prime minister and his deputy.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
NBC News
Publication date: 
07-Feb-2014
Author(s): 
Matthew Cole, Richard Esposito, Mark Schone and Glenn Greenwald
Original story link: 

Eric King, a lawyer who teaches IT law at the London School of Economics and is head of research at Privacy International, a British civil liberties advocacy group, said it was “remarkable” that the British government thought it had the right to hack computers, since none of the U.K.’s intelligence agencies has a “clear lawful authority” to launch their own attacks.

“GCHQ has no clear authority to send a virus or conduct cyber attacks,” said King. “Hacking is one of the most invasive methods of surveillance.” King said British cyber spies had gone on offense with “no legal safeguards” and without any public debate, even though the British government has criticized other nations, like Russia, for allegedly engaging in cyber warfare.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
Computer Weekly
Publication date: 
07-Feb-2014
Author(s): 
Warwick Ashford
Original story link: 

Liberty, Big Brother Watch and Privacy International have described the inquiry as “deeply flawed” in an open letter to the ISC with copies to the prime minister and his deputy.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
The Telegraph
Publication date: 
06-Feb-2014
Author(s): 
Matthew Sparkes
Original story link: 

Privacy International spokesman Mike Rispoli said: "This latest news brings forth the very serious question of whether GCHQ's attacks on servers hosting chatrooms is lawful. There is no British policy in place to initiate cyber attacks. There has been no debate in parliament as to whether we should be using cyber attacks. There is no legislation that clearly authorises GCHQ to conduct cyber attacks. So in the absence of any democratic mechanisms, it appears GCHQ have granted themselves the power to carry out the very same offensive attacks politicians have criticised other states for conducting."

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
BBC
Publication date: 
05-Feb-2014
Original story link: 

Campaign group Privacy International is also worried.

"There is no legislation that clearly authorises GCHQ to conduct cyber-attacks," said head of research Eric King.

"So, in the absence of any democratic mechanisms, it appears GCHQ has granted itself the power to carry out the very same offensive attacks politicians have criticised other states for conducting."

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
BBC
Publication date: 
04-Feb-2014
Author(s): 
Leo Kelion
Original story link: 

"Transparency reports for a long time were really insightful tools for us to see what governments were asking the tech companies," Privacy International's Mike Rispoli told the BBC.

"Now we know that the game has changed.

"Governments do not need to go to companies to get user data - they can directly intercept it. They do not need to go through the front door anymore, they have kicked down the back door."

In the media
Publisher: 
Data Guidance
Publication date: 
30-Jan-2014
Original story link: 

 Anna Fielder, Trustee and Board Chair at Privacy International, said, "Political will is crucial at this stage. The snail pace of the discussions in the EU Council is nothing short of scandalous - one step forward two steps backwards during the last six months of the Lithuanian Presidency. This lack of progress is to the detriment of people's rights."

In the media
Publisher: 
Deutsche Welle
Publication date: 
22-Jan-2014
Author(s): 
Ben Knight
Original story link: 

"The anti-Snowden discourse is no more than a reflection of the perverse attachment to secrecy and obfuscation that dominates intelligence agencies and undermines the fundamental principles of transparency and accountability," Carly Nyst, legal director at Privacy International, told DW in an email.

"Given the public uproar over the mass surveillance programs revealed by Snowden, discussions such as these are blatant attempts by authorities to deflect attention away from themselves and their illegal spying operations," she added.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
SciDev Net
Publication date: 
17-Jan-2014
Author(s): 
Pete Guest
Original story link: 

Edin Omanovic, a surveillance technology specialist at Privacy International, says that the expansion of the control list represents progress, but that more work needs to be done to curtail access to such technologies.

“We have to think of ways for [governments] to enforce the controls,” he says. “It’s always going to be the case that some of these technologies are intangible and very easy to export, which presents unique enforcement challenges that conventional arms don’t.”

In the media
Publisher: 
IT News
Publication date: 
15-Jan-2014
Author(s): 
Darren Pauli
Original story link: 

But London officials close to the WA changes told Privacy International researcher Edin Omanovic it was the intention of WA participants to focus on tools such as the German made FinFisher spy tool to restrict only platforms marketed and used by law enforcement and governments for lawful interception.

"Discussions between Privacy International and export control officials involved in drafting the new controls suggest that it was never the intention of these new controls to catch legitimate security research tools and that efforts have been made to prevent them from being subject to controls," Omanovic said.

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