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Stream: In the media

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In the media
Publisher: 
Bloomberg BNA
Publication date: 
21-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Stephen Gardner
Original story link: 

Gus Hosein, executive director of London-based Privacy International, an advocacy group campaigning for privacy rights, told Bloomberg BNA Oct. 18 that the court had “narrowly interpreted” EU law, and there was potential for challenges against the taking of fingerprints for inclusion in passports to be brought before the European Court of Human Rights. The court ruling was the “perpetuation of a stupid mistake” made by the European Parliament when it approved the collection of fingerprints for passports, Hosein said.

In the media
Publisher: 
Ars Technica
Publication date: 
18-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Cyrus Farivar
Original story link: 

Under Britain's Regulatory and Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) of 2000, the government does have broad powers to conduct digital surveillance. However, many believe that this wholesale data sharing is outside the scope of targeted warrants as described under RIPA. In July 2013, Privacy International, a London-based advocacy group, sued the British government for alleged abuses under the law.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Inquirer
Publication date: 
17-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Dave Neal
Original story link: 

Nineteen civil rights groups have banded together to press the European Parliament into a privacy protection vote on Monday at the "Civil Liberties" committee (LIBE). The group includes just about every well known group in the privacy protecting portfolio, and European Digital Rights (EDRi) is found rubbing shoulders with the Chaos Computer Club, Privacy International and Big Brother Watch.

In the media
Publisher: 
TechWeek Europe
Publication date: 
17-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Tom Brewster
Original story link: 

Privacy International said Rifkind did not appear to be carrying out an independent review. “The credibility of the ISC will continue to decline while the chair of the committee, Sir Malcom Rifkind, acts as the government’s first line of defence, rather than objectively scrutinizing the facts,” said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International. “While we welcome greater public discussion around the failings of the intelligence services, and look forward to being invited to give evidence to the inquiry and hearing the public evidence sessions, we have grave concerns about the impartiality of the committee.”

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
ACTU24
Publication date: 
14-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Par Saër SY
Original story link: 

Le fait que ces bases de données existent ouvre les possibilités qu’elles puissent être utilisées de manière illégale, si la finalité de leur utilisation n’était pas celle spécifiée au moment de leur prise » a indiqué Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion de Privacy international, fondé en 1990.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
13-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Matthew Taylor and Nick Hopkins
Original story link: 

Eric King, head of research at Privacy International, said there were real fears in the legal profession about confidentiality being breached by the security services following the NSA revelations. "We are astonishingly concerned about privileged communications being swept up as part of the mass surveillance programmes we have learned about over the past few months," he said.

Countries: 
In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
11-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Ryan Gallagher
Original story link: 

"The only people who lose are users," says Eric King, head of research at human rights group Privacy International. "Skype promoted itself as a fantastic tool for secure communications around the world, but quickly caved to government pressure and can no longer be trusted to protect user privacy."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Inquirer
Publication date: 
11-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Dave Neal
Original story link: 

Human rights group Privacy International told the Guardian that it makes Skype's previous claims look suspect. "The only people who lose are users," said Eric King, head of research at Privacy International. "Skype promoted itself as a fantastic tool for secure communications around the world, but quickly caved to government pressure and can no longer be trusted to protect user privacy."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Wired
Publication date: 
11-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Liat Clark
Original story link: 

Not everyone is convinced though. Facebook has gone to great pains to describe how it will be better for everyone if this function is ousted, and that this announcement is really just for the benefit of "the small percentage of people still using the setting". But Mike Rispoli, spokesperson for Privacy International, suggests it is undermining a large chunk of its userbase with that thinking. "Facebook may try to minimise this change, saying that it will only affect a single-digit of their nearly 1.2 billion users, but that means anywhere from 12 to over a hundred million people now have less control over their own data and privacy."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
10-Oct-2013
Author(s): 
Nick Hopkins
Original story link: 

Eric King, head of research at Privacy International: "Our intelligence agencies carry out some of the most sensitive and legally complex work in the world. It is shameful that the agreements between the NSA and GCHQ are shrouded in secrecy and this practice must come to an end."

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