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Global Surveillance Monitor

In-depth reports on the current state of privacy in 195 countries around the world.

The newest incarnation of the Global Surveillance Monitor ("GSM") is a first-of-its-kind, comprehensive resource that aims to provide an open and current data set on all laws governing the surveillance and privacy of individuals worldwide.

Currently, accessing and comparing surveillance laws around the world is an arduous and time-consuming process, which often leads to unclear, unreliable, or incomplete results. Yet, access to law is fundamental to an individual's ability to participate fully in society. 

To facilitate that participation, we are developing GSM to create greater understanding of surveillance and privacy laws, how they compare across jurisdictions, and how they affect individuals. We hope that this ambitious project will provide what has thus far been unavailable: a one-stop shop for every country's surveillance and privacy laws.

GSM also seeks to address the issue of interoperability, a common difficulty many organisations have when integrating the valuable data they produce. By providing all the data in the form of RDF, a global standard for data publishing, our approach will allows us to integrate with existing databases in a seamless manner, while also allowing other organisations to use our data without any need to convert it between formats.

For over fifteen years, Privacy International has been co-publishing the 'Privacy and Human Rights' reports, global surveys of recent privacy developments. These studies have become the benchmark global review, used by international organisations, regulators and politicians to advance privacy protections in their own countries. The last global study was released in 2007 and was over 1,200 pages long. The global comparative map we published has been downloaded over a million times and republished hundreds of times in newspapers, blogs, research papers and books. In January 2011, we published a European study that analysed the national privacy and data protection landscapes of 33 European countries.

We are now using this expertise to build a transparent resource that will provide comprehensive, reliable and current data regarding global privacy and surveillance laws, ranging from constitutional privacy protections to data protection legislation to the rules governing communications surveillance.

By providing tools that can compare data, in the form of these legal provisions across jurisdictions, we hope to enable academic institutions, corporations, lawyers, NGOs, and policy makers to understand and advocate for better privacy protections worldwide.

Global Surveillance Monitor

In the media
Publisher: 
Salon
Publication date: 
15-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Natasha Lennard
Original story link: 

“The foreign secretary has told us that if you are a law-abiding citizen, then you have nothing to fear. We’ve heard this excuse before; it’s the sorry line the governments trot out to appease the public," said Mike Rispoli, spokesman for Privacy International.

In the media
Publisher: 
BBC World Service
Publication date: 
14-Jun-2013
Original story link: 

Carly Nyst, Head of International Advocacy at Privacy International, joins "Have Your Say" to talk about the impact on privacy when governments use mass surveillance for intelligence gathering.

In the media
Publisher: 
BBC
Publication date: 
12-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Zoe Kleinman
Original story link: 

However privacy concerns about information uploaded to the internet have been around for almost as long as the internet itself, and campaign group Privacy International says the reported existence of Prism confirms its "worst fears and suspicions".

In the media
Publisher: 
Christian Science Monitor
Publication date: 
11-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Ian Evans
Original story link: 

Mike Rispoli at campaign group Privacy International says Snowden’s actions were "very brave," but that it's hard to predict what Snowden's fate will be.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
11-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Nick Hopkins
Original story link: 

Privacy International said: "Let's not forget: without the release of these classified documents, Mr Hague would not have had to make his statements before the Commons today, and it remains unlikely the news of this programme and the UK's involvement with Prism would have come to light. It should not take a whistleblower releasing classified information for the government to be forthright with its citizens about what data they collect and in what manner.

"If the government secretly interprets the law, and if the manner in which it is executed is secret, then the law is effectively secret. There are many questions that remain unanswered."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Atlantic
Publication date: 
11-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Olga Khazan
Original story link: 

"There is spy technology that we see on James Bond movies that we know have been bought by Germany, the Netherlands, and elsewhere, and we know that it's being used," said Carly Nyst, head of international advocacy at Privacy International.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
10-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
NIck Hopkins
Original story link: 

Mike Rispoli, spokesman for Privacy International, added: "The foreign secretary has told us that if you are a law-abiding citizen, then you have nothing to fear. We've heard this excuse before; it's the sorry line the governments trot out to appease the public."

In the media
Publisher: 
The Guardian
Publication date: 
07-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Nick Hopkins and Nicholas Watts
Original story link: 

Eric King, head of research at Privacy International – a charity focused on the right to privacy – said: "Keeping the public in the dark about secretive and potentially unlawful programmes must stop, and greater oversight is needed to ensure human rights are not being trampled."

In the media
Publisher: 
V3
Publication date: 
07-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Gareth Morgan
Original story link: 

“Essentially anyone who participates in our interconnected world and uses popular services like Google or Skype can have their privacy violated through the Prism programme,” warned Mike Rispoli, a spokesman for Privacy International on its blog.

In the media
Publisher: 
The Register
Publication date: 
07-Jun-2013
Author(s): 
Iain Thompson
Original story link: 

"If the government can get phone numbers of two parties, unique identifiers like IMSI and IMEI, trunk identifiers, and time and duration of call, all listed within the court order, then the Obama administration's justification of 'We don't access content' does not matter," said Mike Rispoli, spokesman for Privacy International.

Countries: 

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