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Global Surveillance Monitor

In-depth reports on the current state of privacy in 195 countries around the world.

The newest incarnation of the Global Surveillance Monitor ("GSM") is a first-of-its-kind, comprehensive resource that aims to provide an open and current data set on all laws governing the surveillance and privacy of individuals worldwide.

Currently, accessing and comparing surveillance laws around the world is an arduous and time-consuming process, which often leads to unclear, unreliable, or incomplete results. Yet, access to law is fundamental to an individual's ability to participate fully in society. 

To facilitate that participation, we are developing GSM to create greater understanding of surveillance and privacy laws, how they compare across jurisdictions, and how they affect individuals. We hope that this ambitious project will provide what has thus far been unavailable: a one-stop shop for every country's surveillance and privacy laws.

GSM also seeks to address the issue of interoperability, a common difficulty many organisations have when integrating the valuable data they produce. By providing all the data in the form of RDF, a global standard for data publishing, our approach will allows us to integrate with existing databases in a seamless manner, while also allowing other organisations to use our data without any need to convert it between formats.

For over fifteen years, Privacy International has been co-publishing the 'Privacy and Human Rights' reports, global surveys of recent privacy developments. These studies have become the benchmark global review, used by international organisations, regulators and politicians to advance privacy protections in their own countries. The last global study was released in 2007 and was over 1,200 pages long. The global comparative map we published has been downloaded over a million times and republished hundreds of times in newspapers, blogs, research papers and books. In January 2011, we published a European study that analysed the national privacy and data protection landscapes of 33 European countries.

We are now using this expertise to build a transparent resource that will provide comprehensive, reliable and current data regarding global privacy and surveillance laws, ranging from constitutional privacy protections to data protection legislation to the rules governing communications surveillance.

By providing tools that can compare data, in the form of these legal provisions across jurisdictions, we hope to enable academic institutions, corporations, lawyers, NGOs, and policy makers to understand and advocate for better privacy protections worldwide.

Global Surveillance Monitor

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Portugal. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.  
 
 
Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Poland. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the report published in the 2010 edition have been provided by Andrzej Adamski and Arkadiusz Lach of Nicolas Copernicus University, Arwid Mednis at Wierzbowski & Wspolnicy (now Wierzbowski Eversheds) and Katarzyna Szymielewicz at the Panoptykon Foundation.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Norway. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the report published in the 2010 edition have been provided by Christine Hafskjold at The Norwegian Board of Technology and Lee A. Bygrave, Tobias Mahler and Thomas Olsen at the Norwegian Research Center for Computers and Law, University of Oslo.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation

 
 

 

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in the Netherlands. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the 2010 report have been provided by: eLaw@Leiden, the Center for Law in the Information Society at Leiden University, Wolter Pieters of the Faculty of the University of Twente and David Riphagen, former EPIC Fellow.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.  
 
Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Luxembourg. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.  
 
 
Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Lithuania. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the 2010 report have been provided by: Henrikas Mickevičius, Human Rights Monitoring Institute, Mindaugas Kiskis at Mykolas Romeris University and Paulius Galubickas at Sorainen.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation

 
 
Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Latvia. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the Latvian Report published in the 2010 edition have been provided by Raivo Raudzeps of Sorainen and Professor Arturs Kucs, Head of the Department of International and European Law at the University of Latvia.

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Italy. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013.  Updates to the 2010 report have been provided by Marco Calamari of Progetto Winston Smith, Michele Iaselli of the Associazione Nazionale per la Difesa della Privacy, Ugo Pagallo at the Universita degli Studi di Torino and Guido Scorza of the Istituto per le Politiche dell'Innovazione.

Report
01-Jan-2011

 

This country report is an attempt to evaluate the privacy and surveillance laws and practices in place in this country. This 2010 report was updated with the financial support of the European Commission's Special Programme "Fundamental Rights and Citizenship," 2007-2013.  Updates to the Hungarian Report published in the 2010 edition have been provided by: Ivan Szekely, Open Society Archives at Central European University, Hungary; Máté SzaBó, Office of the Commissioner for Educational Rights at Ministry of Education, Hungary; Endre Győző Szabó, Department of Judicial Cooperation and Private International Law of the Ministry of Public Administration and Justice, Hungary.
 
Privacy International are in the process of updating these country reports globally, it is a huge undertaking and we are always looking for in country knowledge. If you have some information to share or if you spot a error, or an area that the law or practice has been updated, please email us. Any donations would be gratefully received to help us keep these reports up to date. 
 

 

Report
01-Jan-2011

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Greece. The 2010 report was updated with the support of the European Commission's Fundamental Rights and Citizenship programme 2007-2013. Updates to the 2010 report have been provided by Vagelis Papakonstantinou of PK Partners and Elena Spiropoulou of Spiropoulou & Associates.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation
 
 

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