Privacy International defends the right to privacy across the world, and fights surveillance and other intrusions into private life by governments and corporations. Read more »


Reports

Subject reports

Privacy International has been producing world-class research reports for over a decade, in collaboration with academic institutions across the globe. We work on a huge range of topics, from counterterrorism policy, to financial privacy, to EU data protection rules.

Report
14-Dec-2013

New technologies may hold great benefits for the developing world, but without strong legal frameworks ensuring that rights are adequately protected, they pose serious threats to populations they are supposed to empower.

This is never more evident than with the rapid and widespread implementation of biometric technology. Whilst concerns and challenges are seen in both developed and developing countries when it comes to biometrics, for the latter they are more acute due the absence of laws or flawed legal frameworks, which are failing to uphold and ensure the protection of basic human rights.

Report
26-Nov-2013

Our special report shining a light on the secretive Five Eyes alliance, where we lay out how the laws around which the Five Eyes are constructed violate human rights law, and argue the Five Eyes States owe a general duty not to interfere with communications that pass through their territorial borders.

Report
16-Sep-2013

Privacy International is grateful to the students and staff of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Law Clinical Legal Education Centre, for providing research assistance to this paper.

The advent of new technologies and the Internet have provided new challenges to long-standing human rights norms. By facilitating increased State surveillance and intervention into individuals’ private lives, the spread of digital technologies has created a serious need for States to update their understandings and regulation of surveillance and modify their practices to ensure that individuals’ human rights are respected and protect.

Accordingly, in July 2013, Privacy International, in conjunction with the Electronic Fronteir Foundation, Access and a range of civil society organisations and academic experts, launched the International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance. The Principles articulate what international human rights law – which binds every country across the globe – requires of governments when conducting surveillance in the digital age.

Report
07-Dec-2012

Privacy has truly become an issue of global resonance.  A quick glance at policy agendas in countries around the world shows that privacy and surveillance issues are increasingly important.  The challenge, however, is improving the ability of governments and policy stakeholders to engage in a policy debate that is informed about the dangers of surveillance and the importance of protecting privacy.  This is the primary objective of our Privacy in the Developing World programme.

In this report, we summarise our partner’s research into privacy in developing countries across Asia. The experiences of privacy in these countries are illustrative of the many opportunities for and challenges to the advancement of privacy, not only the developing world but across the world.

Report
30-Jul-2012

This briefing provides an overview of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Bahrain. The regulations that permit access to personal data, the communications interception regime and relevant consitutional safeguards are highlighted and examined. This is not intended to be a full analysis, but rather contains all the necessary information to facilitate a basic understanding of surveillance practices inside Bahrain, especially with regards to to foreign companies supplying surveillance and monitoring technologies. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - this is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
18-Jul-2012

This report was submitted to the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Under the current version of the draft Communications Data Bill, records of every person or entity with whom any given individual has communicated electronically would be collected continuously and stored for one year. These records would include the time of the communication and the location from which it originated. 

The Communications Data Bill raises a number of concerns with regards to the right to privacy under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act. There are also concerns about the right to free expression under Article 10 and the right to freedom of assembly and association under Article 11 due to the potential chilling effect of the 'menace of surveillance' (Klass v Germany), but as these apply more generally to the broader domain of communications surveillance in the UK, we have restricted our comments to Article 8 issues for the purposes of this response.

Many thanks to Covington and Burling who assisted with the preparation of this submission. 

Report
03-Jan-2012

This is a memo prepared by Barry Steinhardt of Friends of Privacy USA for Members of the European Parliament regarding the proposed EU-US Agreement PNR.

The proposed agreement regarding Passenger Name Records (PNR) between the United States and the European Union is riddled with faulty assertions and assumptions about US law and the actual operations of the US government.

These faulty assertions and assumptions go to the heart of the agreement and undercut the claims of protections for European travelers.

As an American lawyer with substantial experience on the PNR and related issues, I want to set the record straight for the European officials who must act on the proposed agreement.

This memo highlights the most serious of those faulty claims and assumptions.

Report
31-Oct-2011

Last month the European Parliament adopted a resolution that amends the current dual-use export mechanism and inserted a licensing requirement for ICTs that are likely to become instrumental in human rights violations, if exported.

However, this is only a first step because there is no ex ante control and the export control mechanisms (and underlying benchmarks) are primarily the responsibility of the EU Member States.

Country reports

Is your government reading your emails? Are your medical records secure? Does your national constitution protect you? Our in-depth country reports use local research and experience, so we can tell you what's really going on in over 40 count ries around the world.

Report
14-Nov-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in India. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
29-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in the Philippines. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
23-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Bangladesh. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
23-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Pakistan. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
22-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Indonesia. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
22-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Malaysia. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
22-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in Nepal. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada. 

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.

Report
22-Oct-2012

This country report is an evaluation of privacy and surveillance laws, policies and practices in China. It was produced under the 'Privacy in the Developing World' project, funded by the International Development Research Centre in Canada.

We aim to keep our knowledge of the state of privacy across the world as up-to-date as possible - it is a huge undertaking and we are always keen to gather more local knowledge. If you have some information to share or you spot an error, please drop us a line at info@privacy.org. If you would like to support this crucial research project, please consider making a donation.