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Shades of “deep grey”; lessons from an undercover surveillance investigation

Date: 
23 June 2017

Al Jazeera recently published an investigation into the shadowy trade of communications surveillance technologies. Their undercover reporter revealed four companies offering to illegally sell highly intrusive surveillance technologies to the governments of South Sudan and Iran, both of which are subject to extensive international sanctions.

Privacy International Sends Warning Briefing and Anti-Surveillance Phone Pouch to Brexit Negotiators to Help Them Stay Secure

Date: 
18 June 2017

PRESS RELEASE: Privacy International Sends Warning Briefing and Anti-Surveillance Phone Pouch to Brexit Negotiators to Help Them Stay Secure

Please find attached a copy of the briefing along with promotional photographs with the briefing.

Privacy International has today sent top EU and UK Brexit negotiators* a briefing on their vulnerability to potential surveillance by each other, and others. Brexit negotiations are to begin today. 

PRESS NOTICE: Privacy International back in court for a hearing related to the collection of bulk personal datasets and bulk communications data

Date: 
7 June 2017

The Case

Privacy International v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs et al. (Bulk Personal Datasets & Bulk Communications Data challenge)

Date: 5-9 June 2017

Time: from 10:00 onwards

Location: Royal Courts of Justice, The Strand, London WC2A 2LL United Kingdom

 

Hearing overview

Everything's on fire. Here's how we're trying put it out.

Date: 
6 June 2017

The past few years have seen a huge rise in the number of attacks both active and passive, against organisations big and small. Attacks against organisations happen for a multitude of reasons: extortion via "ransomware", exfiltration of commercial secrets, or just "the lulz". While this can be crippling to a commercial business, it can potentially be devastating to an NGO, especially those which work to hold powerful institutions to account. The types of information held by such NGOs could potentially lead to arrests, kidnappings, or even deaths, if it were to be released.

PRESS STATEMENT: Privacy International and the Italian Coalition for Civil Liberties and Rights call to Amend DDL Orlando on Hacking

Date: 
22 May 2017

On 15 March 2017, the Italian Senate voted on a Bill, put forward by Justice Minister Andrea Orlando, that will reform the criminal justice system, including amending the Code of Criminal Procedure. Among the many provisions contained in DDL Orlando, currently pending approval by the Italian House of Representatives, the Government is mandated to regulate, via a legislative decree, the utilisation of malware (commonly referred to as ‘Trojans’ in Italian discourse) to engage hacking for criminal investigations.

The Identity We Can't Change

Date: 
16 May 2017

We look at our smartphone first thing in the morning to check the weather, and our to-do list for the day. During breakfast, we read the news and learn about what is going on in the rest of the world. In our commute to work or college, we scroll through our social media feeds to check on our friends, family, and acquaintances. We might download a new app, or listen to a new song.

Social media intelligence and profiling in the insurance industry: it’s not only the price you pay that will be affected

Date: 
24 April 2017

The financial services industry is eager to gather more and more data about our lives. Apart from mining the data they have historically collected such as credit history, they are looking to use our social media profiles to reach into our friendships and social interactions. They are using these data in new and unexpected ways, including personality profiling to determine the risk of lending to you, and thus the price you will pay.

Defeating encryption: the battle of governments against their people

Date: 
28 March 2017

Technologists hoped the “Crypto Wars” of the 1990s – which ended with cryptographers gaining the right to legally develop strong encryption that governments could not break – was behind them once and for all. Encryption is a fundamental part of our modern life, heavily relied on by everything from online banking and online shopping services to the security our energy infrastructure.

In Kenya, communications surveillance is a matter of life and death: new Privacy International investigation

Date: 
15 March 2017

On a hot day in Nairobi, our researcher is speaking to an officer of Kenya’s National Intelligence Service (NIS). The afternoon is wearing on and the conversation has turned to the presidential elections, taking place in August this year. He has just finished describing the NIS’ highly secret surveillance powers and the disturbing ways in which these powers are deployed.

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